atoz Barsbooks-stackBritish_Telecomcalendar caret-downcaret-left caret-rightcaret-upChartchevron-bottomchevron-leftchevron-rightchevron-topcloseComment delta-down Email FacebookHarthistory_logo_black history_logo_white history minus-sign-black open-book Pinterest play-circleplayplus-sign-black Post SearchSignalsvg-defstalktalktelevision tw-like tw-reply tw-retweet tw-verified TwitterTwitter2user-shapeusersVineWhatsApp Youtube

this day in history 1971

Nixon announces visit to China

During a live television and radio broadcast, President Richard Nixon stuns America by announcing that he would visit communist China the following year. The statement marked a dramatic turning point in U.S.-China relations, as well as a major shift in American foreign policy. Nixon was not always so eager to reach out to China. Since the Communists came to power in China in 1949, Nixon had been one of the most vociferous critics of American efforts to establish diplomatic relations with the Chinese.

His political reputation was built on being strongly anti-communist, and he was a major figure in the post-World War II Red Scare, during which the U.S. government launched massive investigations into possible communist subversion in America. By 1971, a number of factors pushed Nixon to reverse his stance on China. First and foremost was the Vietnam War. Two years after promising the American people "peace with honour," Nixon was as entrenched in Vietnam as ever. His national security advisor, Henry Kissinger, saw a way out: since China's break with the Soviet Union in the mid-1960s, the Chinese were desperate for new allies and trade partners.

Kissinger aimed to use the promise of closer relations and increased trade possibilities with China as a way to put increased pressure on North Vietnam, a Chinese ally, to reach an acceptable peace settlement. Also, more importantly in the long run, Kissinger thought the Chinese might become a powerful ally against the Soviet Union, America’s Cold War enemy. Kissinger called such foreign policy realpolitik, or politics that favoured dealing with other powerful nations in a practical manner rather than on the basis of political doctrine or ethics. Nixon undertook his historic "journey for peace" in 1972, beginning a long and gradual process of normalising relations between the People's Republic of China and the United States.

Though this move helped revive Nixon’s sagging popularity, and contributed to his win in the 1972 election, it did not produce the short-term results for which Kissinger had hoped. The Chinese seemed to have little influence on North Vietnam's negotiating stance, and the Vietnam War continued to drag on until U.S. withdrawal in 1973. Further, the budding U.S.-China alliance had no measurable impact on U.S.-Soviet relations. But Nixon's visit did prove to be a watershed moment in American foreign policy, for it paved the way for future U.S. presidents to apply the principle of realpolitik to their own international dealings.

Big Knight In - Leaderboard