atoz Barsbooks-stackBritish_Telecomcalendar caret-downcaret-left caret-rightcaret-upChartchevron-bottomchevron-leftchevron-rightchevron-topcloseComment delta-down Email FacebookHarthistory_logo_black history_logo_white history minus-sign-black open-book Pinterest play-circleplayplus-sign-black Post SearchSignalsvg-defstalktalktelevision tw-like tw-reply tw-retweet tw-verified TwitterTwitter2user-shapeusersVineWhatsApp Youtube

History's Most Feared Weapons

As a group of master weapon-makers compete to create some of history’s most infamous weapons on Forged in Fire, we’re expecting to see nothing short of this list - some of the most formidable and bad-ass weapons that have ever been wielded throughout history:

Greek Fire

Greek-fire-forged-in-fire
Image source: Wikipedia.org

So effective that its victims would continue to burn whilst on water, Greek Fire was a terrifying weapon that was utilized by the Byzantine navy during the seventh century and was apparently capable of defying the laws of physics. The actual formula of this was a state secret kept closely guarded, unsurprisingly.

The Man Catcher

Used up to the 18th century in Europe, the man catcher was a pole with a two-pronged head. Each prong had a spring-loaded door that would help it to ensnare its victims, who couldn’t then escape from it. It was often used to pull people off horses, before they were either taken as hostages or just killed more easily from an extra vulnerable position.

Boiling Oil

To be used to take out the pesky enemies attempting to scale your castle’s walls. Any other boiling liquid could be substituted at a push.

Broadsword

Broadsword-Forged-in-Fire
Image source: Unrealworld.wikia.com

A military sword used by the cavalry and knights alike, this weapon has been in use since the Middle Ages. Living up to its name, with a wider blade than its counterparts, the broadsword could easily slice through flesh, severing limbs in a single stroke.

Morning Star

Like a mace, but so much worse, the morning star is simple in its design: a wooden or metal stick topped with a metal ball set with spikes and blades. The medieval weapon, which came into use with soldiers in the 14th century, would typically be aimed at the heads and faces of foes, though could take down an enemy when aimed at legs and knees just as easily.

Dragon Beard Hook

Used by Chinese warriors, the Dragon Beard Hook comprised a two-headed serrated metal hook attached to a rope. The hook was used to snag an enemy’s body, before they would be pulled in using the rope. The weapon caused so much damage, though, that its victims often died before they could be reeled in to be killed.

The Zweihander

Zweihander-Forged-in-Fire
Image source: Shortymonster.co.uk

A sword so heavy that it required two hands to lift it, this formidable weapon was allegedly able to decapitate up to seven people at once, which makes it well worth the extra effort required to wield it.

War Scythe

Like a normal scythe—the farming tool—except equipped with a blade capable of slicing through a metal helmet. Fear the war scythe. Fear it.

The Knobkerrie

On the face of things, a knobkerrie (a short stick with a knob of wood or metal on the end, originating from Southern and Eastern Africa) doesn’t seem like anything special, especially when compared to the Dragon Beard Hook. But imagine getting slammed in the nose, or worse yet, the groin, up close with it and then you’ll understand its true power.